Tag Archives: assessment

Mel Collie |Is Plantar Fascia Just a Symptom?

Mel Collie |Is Plantar Fascia Just a Symptom?

Your feet are hurting , maybe your heel is burning and keeps you awake at night, it could possibly be a plantar fascia issue..

 

You used to rub a tennis ball over the fascia and that did the trick…for a while, but it always came back.

 

It may be a simple test, but when I assess you for plantar fascia, I will look at your single leg stance.

 

What happens when you stand on one leg.

 

What happens to the foot, does it roll in or out, what happens to your toes..do they scrunch up?

 

Does the same thing happen on the other foot?

 

Do the muscles in your toes seek stability, they are probably doing that if they scrunch up, grabbing at the floor with the tips?

 

What happening to your big toe? Does it lift up, lose contact with the floor?

 

What is happening further up the chain, in the shin, the calf, the thigh, the glutes..the neck and the head.

 

Very often the foot pain is a symptom, and rather than place a plaster over it, would you like to know why , find the cause, deal with it and then understand the “why”?

Plantar Fascia, Calves, Glutes
Plantar Fascia, Calves, Glutes

Our bodies are so amazing at compensating, that we don’t even realise it. Quite fascinating.

 

The patterns it has, the patterns that change, through injury or just bad movement habits picked up over the years, the brain will choose the path of least resistance.

 

Its my work to unravel the pieces and put back the jigsaw, but without guessing or going by the text book. By testing your bodies compensations and finding out its “why”. Because we are all unique.

 

Single leg stance testing  – its my favourite “go to” test to unravel a puzzle.

You can try it out on yourself, you may find one foot pronates – flattens, you may find the other one supinates, lifts up, the arch increases.

The muscles in the foot start in the lower leg. You may find the outer shin muscles can be quite tender to massage, its a good place to start though, by massaging the tender areas, it will feel like you are pressing on a bruise, for 2 minutes, be gentle though, until you feel the high toned area begin to “give” a little, then increase the pressure a little more.

After 2 minutes, do a glute strength exercise, a standing donkey kick is a good one. Bending the knee, and kicking back to the wall behind, with a flat foot, as though the bottom of the foot is pressing the wall away. 5 reps should do it.

Repeat the whole thing 4 times a day.

However, because this ia a blog post and Ive not assessed your posture, this is a very general “go to” exercise, your glutes may not be the issue, it maybe the neck, the jaw, the lower back..but the glutes are a good place to start, after all, we all sit more than our bodies like us to, and glutes “switch off” when we sit, and other muscles take over and of the job.

We are an amazing piece of kit!

Mel Collie

www.melcollie.com

How strong is your core? Is there something else compensating for your abs? Want to nail those core exercises? Fed up with nagging lower back pain?

Assessments and treatments from Portreath, Cornwall from May6th 2016.

https://v1.bookwhen.com/melcollie

Check the NKT website for a practitioner near you
 http://neurokinetictherapy.com/certified-practitioners

Mel Collie | Athletic Movement

Mel Collie | Athletic Movement

First & foremost, athletic movement is about human movement.

How you move.

I’m often saying to clients in my sessions – its not about achieving the end range of the move, its what you use to get there..Im not impressed that you can do 10 reps in side kick kneeling, for example, if your shoulder is hiked up, your hips aren’t level, your bottom knee is wonky and your toes are curled up.

You are compensating to achieve those reps. You are cheating.

Its not about doing loads of sit ups, leg lifts, rotations, side bends, planks, push ups.

Its what you use to get you there

Its what form you have, from beginning to end.

Its what you use to flex and extend.

Its how you move, not how you look that defines an athlete.

Sound movement practice cannot be achieved with limited flexibility, poor stability and mobility.

Limited ankle mobility means a more mobile knee – which creates instability in a hinge joint that wants stability, if its too mobile because the ankles are lacking mobility, the knee will tell you about it.

Instability in the shoulder and /or wrist can lead to pain in the elbow. Too much texting, overworked flexed muscles in the fingers, tight pec minor, weaker rotator cuffs, tighter elevator scapula, weakened rhomboids. Do you know which is which and whats going on in your system?

Your body is sensitive to input.

Tight & weak muscles change the input, the sensory system has to adapt, creating changes in your kinetic chain, all the way up the system.

This creates pain, fatigue, bad form, dysfunction, stress.

Get assessed, then move on and play the game.

 

Mel Collie

Movement & Pattern Detective

http://neurokinetictherapy.com