Tag Archives: back pain

Mel Collie | Jaw and Back Pain

Mel Collie | Jaw and Back Pain

My client has lower back pain, not common I grant you that, but this case was a little different when she told me as we discussed her history if pain and injuries that her jaw liked a lot since she was a kid when she had braces fitted.

I checked her jaw alignment.

It went to her right quite a bit.

When that happens the body compensates in other ways.

I checked one of her back muscles to see if it was inhibited or facilitated…it was inhibited.

Going back to her jaw, after checking to see if there was a connection with this and her weaker lower back muscle, turned out there was, releasing the jaw made her back switch on like Christmas tree lights.

Homework for her to do at least twice a day, as the brain takes a few thousand reps to unwind an old movement pattern and dysfunction, was to release that tight jaw on the right side and strengthen the lower back.

Will check back with her in 2 weeks to see if that new pattern has held.

Mel

www.melcollie.com

Level II Neuro Kinetic Therapy

Pilates Level III

 

Mel Collie | Ever massaged your Diaphragm?

Mel Collie | Ever massaged your Diaphragm?

 

Todays Neuro Kinetic Therapy special was a curious one, but as I have learned with this technique, I go with what the body tells me.

diaphragm

I was going to do some work on the right foot , but as the diaphragm was flaring and something my client had mentioned in our chat at the beginning of the session, I tested the diaphragm against the abdominals and her glutes as she has a tucked under pelvis and shortened space between lower rib and hip bone, slight kyphosis and altered neck position…(I will ask you questions later..:) )

I found a facilitated spot on the diaphragm, a bit tender, and when I theory localised it, the glutes switched on, as did her core muscles, which meant that when we tested the core muscles, there was no visible shaking in the upper neck, and no jaw clenching.

The diaphragm can be a compensator for so many things…
It may seem too simple for you as a client to do breathing homework (what you don’t get 100 sit ups and press ups? !!…umm…nope…) ..but breathing is the most repetitive movement you will do each and every day, and I guess you’ve been doing those reps for quite a while now…

 

Mel Collie

NKT Level 1 Practitioner

www.melcollie.com

Mel Collie | Why your calf muscles are tight & what to do about it

Why your calf muscles are tight & what to do about it

Bit of a long title, but does what it says on the tin..tight calf muscles, stretch them and they are just like your tight hamstrings, they always come back, why is that, could it be they are tight for a reason, tight because something else isn’t allowing them to “let go”?

This could possibly be inhibited glutes, which means your glutes may not be doing their job, but your calves are instead.

Get the bum working and the calves can release.

How you can do that?

Find a tender area on your calf and give is a massage with your fingers or with a tennis ball or foam roller.

Calf Muscles

About 30 – 60 seconds is just fine

Then strengthen the glutes by doing 5 reps of a glute bridge. Don’t hold your breath or clench the jaw.

glutebridge

Repeat twice a day

Your glutes will love you..

 

Mel

www.melcollie.com

Mel Collie | Low Back Pain?

Mel Collie | Low Back Pain?

Have you ever had an MRI scan and been told by your GP that theres absolutely nothing wrong with your lower back, even though it hurts and has been nagging your for ever and affects your lifestyle, your energy and mood, but your MRI says that you are mistaken and your GP says its all in your head.

Something like that can make you feel stupid, doubt yourself and depressed

Many of us weren’t taught anatomy in school, I certainly was, or I was off school that day..or maybe my 51 year old brain just doesn’t remember that far back..

I think I will go for the latter!

Turns out that your little discs between the bones in your spine have to be very far out of place in order to touch a nerve, so if you are worried about disc bulges, they aren’t that common

If the words on your MRI report say they have found nothing wrong, then your discs are doing just fine, if you are over 50 like me then your spine will have some wear and tear, its normal.

You’ve also got muscles attached to your spine, surprised?

Many of us stretch our hamstrings or quads, those muscles on the back and front of your thigh..

But we are surprised when our lower back hurts because we don’t move as the body was designed to move.

Its just the way of the modern world

We sit

A lot

The most powerful muscle of the body is the one we sit on.

The glutes, you have 2 other them

You also have 2 muscles either side of the lower back that are a common issue in lower back pain, because we don’t do a lot of side bending, these muscles get tight…or weak..one might be tight, the other may be ok, until you have an assessment, you will just be guessing.

If ones weak, it could still be painful if ones tight it can mean its doing double the work, its what is known as facilitated, it could be working for other muscles that are nearby that have stopped doing their job, because of sitting, injury, surgery…or just because…you may never know why, its fixing it that you want, a result.

I’m opening up my new therapy centre in Portreath,  Cornwall, using Neuro Kinetic Therapy, from May 6th, specialising in assessing core strength and stability and lower back pain treatments.

Heres where Ive added some available dates for assessments with a discounted opening offer for all clients.

https://v1.bookwhen.com/melcollie

Mel Collie

NKT Level 1 & Pilates Instructor

www.melcollie.com

 

Mel Collie | Should You be Doing Pilates For Your Core?

Mel Collie | Should You be Doing Pilates For Your Core?

In answer to my core question which was “Are you happy doing this kind of training, do you actually like it ?”(because if you are doing something you loathe, you probably won’t stick at it for long…) she replied…”Well, I know I really should be doing Pilates for my core, shouldn’t I ? ”

She is currently doing 3 sessions a week of 15 – 20 minute strength training.

That means moves like squats, lunges, shoulder bridges (this isn’t an exclusive Pilates exercise), push ups , running on the spot, rows, rotational moves, arm strength moves like bicep curls, shoulder presses, tricep kick backs, lat raises.

Does all of that mean she is NOT using her core?

Doubt it..

Where is your core?

…is it just your belly?

Well, many of us do believe it is, but its way more than that!

It also includes(not exclusively…) your spine, your lower back and upper back, your shoulders, your neck, your pelvis, your upper legs, your inner thighs, your bum, your knees, and especially your foot positioning…

When the feedback from your feet to your brain gets messed up the resulting movement pattern will be unorganised.

However, Pilates is very much touted as the go to exercise for your core

For some people who adore pilates, it is just that, which is great…for them..

But please, lets stop the touting ( usually by Pilates instructors , and I am one of them!) that its the only way to train your core

It isn’t

Thats a lie

I’ve seen many Pilates people have no core at all and using neck muscles instead (that was me!)

You can do as many core exercises as you like, but still have – possibly – weak Psoas as you use obliques instead to compensate, weak Psoas as you use the neck to compensate, weak TVA( a major “core” muscle) as you use breath holding and/or neck muscles to compensate.

And there could be other compensations along the line, because you are unique! Your movement patterns are yours, not off the shelf.

What can you do? Get tested.

An NKT specialist will help you “find” your core, and use it effectively, to recognise compensations, how to release them and get these unorganised patterns organised, so you an be effective in whatever training you chose to do to work your core, Pilates, Yoga, Weights, Cross Fit, HiiT, Swimming, Surfing, Running, Rowing, Climbing, Boxing..the list goes on.

Mel

www.melcollie.com